Strictly’s Craig Revel Horwood ‘in row with BBC for using fab-u-lous catchphrase in bed advert’

Strictly Come Dancing’s Craig Revel Horwood is reportedly in line with BBC bosses for using his “fab-u-lous” slogan in a bed ad.

The 56-year-old judge stars in an advertising campaign for the bed company Dreams, in which he uses his famous line. Craig is said to have violated strict guidelines.

The BBC discourages its stars from replicating their roles on the channel for personal commercial gain, with Craig’s role in the Dreams commercials being viewed as a conflict of interest as he often uses his “fabulous” catchphrase while playing dancers Strictly criticized.

Under Fire: Strictly Come Dancing's Craig Revel Horwood is reportedly in line with BBC bosses for using his

Under Fire: Strictly Come Dancing’s Craig Revel Horwood is reportedly in line with BBC bosses for using his “fab-u-lous” slogan in a bed ad

One of the company’s Instagram posts featured a blurry picture of Craig lying next to a log that said, “Log made a fabulous new boyfriend. Can you guess who it is? ‘

However, the BBC’s editorial guidelines state that any celebrity promotional work for the company should not “mimic or replicate their on-air roles,” with the rules saying that this includes “any iconic Strictly phrases used for commercial associations will”.

After The Mirror reported the violation to the BBC, the word was quickly removed from the post.

A BBC employee unrelated to the dance show told the publication, “At first glance it seems to mimic his role on Strictly, as he gives advice on how certain dances should be performed … just” like him would be for any candidate appearing on the show. ‘

Oh oh: The judge, 56, starred in an ad campaign for bed company Dreams using his famous line, but Craig reportedly violated strict guidelines

Oh oh: The judge, 56, starred in an ad campaign for bed company Dreams using his famous line, but Craig reportedly violated strict guidelines

In other aspects of Craig’s big role, the choreographer shows various sleeping positions inspired by different dance poses for use in the Dreams Sleep Like a Log travel guide.

In one, the TV personality says, “The Tango sleeping position is about creating a certain amount of space between your bodies while staying in the spoon position.”

While another advises him, “Like the Charleston, this position is about keeping your body more streamlined so you don’t spread out like a starfish and take up most of the bed.”

While the word “fab-u-lous” is against the guidelines, the rest of the campaign and use of dance positions are not exclusive to Strictly Come Dancing.

Rules: The BBC discourages its stars from replicating their roles on the channel for personal commercial gain, with Craig's role in the Dreams advertisements being viewed as a conflict of interest

Rules: The BBC discourages its stars from replicating their roles on the channel for personal commercial gain, with Craig’s role in the Dreams advertisements being viewed as a conflict of interest

Drama: On a company Instagram post, a blurry picture of Craig lying next to a log was captioned, “Log is a great new friend.  Can you guess who it is? '

Drama: On a company Instagram post, a blurry image of Craig lying next to a log is captioned, “Log made a fabulous new boyfriend. Can you guess who it is? ‘

A BBC source told The Mirror: “Craig is a professional dancer and choreographer and he was long before he joined Strictly.

“Because of his job and his expertise as a choreographer and dance maker, he was asked to create these sleeping positions for the campaign, a role he doesn’t have at Strictly.

“The identified dances are common dance terms and are not unique or exclusive to Strictly.”

MailOnline has approached Craig and Strictly representatives for comment.

Craig isn’t the only BBC star to come under fire for breaking the company’s rules.

Strict: The BBC's editorial guidelines, however, state that any celebrity promotion for the company should not

Strict: The BBC’s editorial guidelines, however, state that any celebrity promotion for the company should not “mimic or replicate their on-air roles.”

Allowed: Although the word

Allowed: While the word “fab-u-lous” is against the guidelines, the rest of the campaign and use of dance positions are not exclusive to Strictly Come Dancing

Nick Knowles angered bosses and risked his job at DIY: SOS in May this year after appearing as a jobbing builder in an ad for Shreddies cereal.

The ad is said to violate the broadcaster’s strict advertising rules, which prohibit talented TV players from exchanging their on-screen personas.

During the previous month’s crunch zoom meetings, Nick was told by corporate executives to take the ad out of the air or end the show that was helping him kick off his career.

Since Nick could not leave his already aired and already paid ad, he had to resign from his BBC show while the ad was running.

The broadcaster’s strict rules state that any advertisement that features on-screen talent does not “imitate, suggest a reference or association with, or“ pass on ”BBC content.

Another rule breaker: Nick Knowles pissed off bosses and risked his job at DIY: SOS in May this year after appearing as a jobbing builder in an ad for Shreddies Muesli (pictured on DIY SOS).

Another rule breaker: Nick Knowles pissed off bosses and risked his job at DIY: SOS in May this year after appearing as a jobbing builder in an ad for Shreddies Muesli (pictured on DIY SOS).

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