Some Sacramento-area medical providers warn of ICU hospital bed shortage this winter

Some medical providers in the Sacramento area are warning of a shortage of intensive care beds in the coming months. “We have been very busy,” said Dr. Brian Evans, President of Mercy Hospital Folsom. “Our intensive care unit … has been full or almost full for a few months.” Evans said his hospital has seen a worrying trend in patients this winter season, and it’s not just COVID-19 from people going to intensive care that is medical Postponing problems, “Evans said. People are showing up with chronic conditions like diabetes or high blood pressure that went untreated during the pandemic.” Some people present themselves very sick in hospitals, “Evans added.” I think people have Things medically postponed, maybe they are nervous about seeing their doctor; getting COVID-19. “That puts more pressure on community hospitals, a problem that is being felt across the country – our hospitals are pretty full,” said Dr. Olivia Kasirye, Sacramento County Health Officer. Dr. Kasirye said it was not uncommon to see more patients in intensive care this time of year, but shared her concerns about a possible winter spike in COVID-19, “she noted. “We know the flu season is very mild, but we are still at the beginning of the season so it is important that people take steps to make sure they stay healthy.” On Tuesday, district data showed 78% of ICU beds are occupied. “I really want people to take good care of themselves, get the necessary preventive maintenance and make sure they get their chronic illness under control,” said Evans. “Make sure you are fully vaccinated. If you are eligible for a refresher, you will get this too, ”said Kasirye. Although ICU beds may be limited, patients should still check in themselves if they need help, Evans said. “We work with all of the other hospitals in the area,” Evans said. “We’re going to figure out the capacity issues.” While many hospitals in the area no longer have intensive care beds, UC Davis Medical Center is an exception. “At this point in time, we are seeing normal intensive care volume at UC Davis Health,” wrote Pam Wu spokesman. “As the region’s Level 1 trauma center, UC Davis Medical Center is ready for a patient surge. Our health professionals encourage everyone to get vaccinated and follow public health guidelines to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 and other winter diseases to prevent.” Season.”

Some medical providers in the Sacramento area are warning of a shortage of intensive care beds in the coming months.

“We have been very busy,” said Dr. Brian Evans, President of Mercy Hospital Folsom. “Our intensive care unit … has been full or almost full for a few months.”

Evans said his hospital had seen a worrying trend in patients this winter season, and it wasn’t just COVID-19.

“We see a lot of people going to intensive care with medical issues put off,” Evans said.

People are showing up with chronic conditions like diabetes or high blood pressure that went untreated during the pandemic.

“Some people present themselves very sick in hospitals,” added Evans. “I think people have put things off medically, maybe nervous about seeing their doctor; getting COVID-19.”

This increases the pressure on community hospitals, a problem that is being felt across the country.

“Right now we know our hospitals are pretty full,” said Dr. Olivia Kasirye, Sacramento District Public Health Officer.

Dr. Kasirye said it was not uncommon to see more patients in intensive care this time of year, but shared her concerns about a possible winter spike in COVID-19.

“At this time of year, a lot of people travel, go to crowded malls, meet at home,” she observed. “We know the flu season is very mild, but we are still at the beginning of the season so it is important that people take steps to make sure they stay healthy.”

On Tuesday, district data showed that 78% of the beds in the intensive care unit are occupied.

“We really want people to take good care of themselves, get the preventative maintenance they need, and make sure they are getting their chronic illness under control,” Evans said.

“Make sure you are fully vaccinated. If you are eligible for a refresher, get this too, ”said Kasirye.

Although ICU beds may be limited, patients should still check in themselves if they need help, Evans said.

“We work with all of the other hospitals in the area,” said Evans. “We will clarify the capacity problems.”

While ICU beds are running out in many hospitals in the region, UC Davis Medical Center is an exception.

“At this point, we are seeing normal intensive care volume at UC Davis Health,” wrote spokeswoman Pam Wu. “As the region’s Level 1 trauma center, UC Davis Medical Center is ready for a patient surge. Our health professionals encourage everyone to get vaccinated and follow public health guidelines to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 and other winter diseases to prevent.” Season.”

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