See How LACMA’s New Interscope Records Show Pairs Artists With the Musicians That Inspire Them, from Lana Del Rey to Dr. Dre

For just a few short weeks, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) is hosting “Artists Inspired By Music: Interscope Reimagined”, which pairs paintings by Ed Ruscha, Amoako Boafo, Kehinde Wiley, and Anna Weyant with songs or albums from Interscope Records. The exhibition came about as a means to celebrate the music label’s 30th anniversary, and Dr Dre, Billie Eilish, Kendrick Lamar, Nine Inch Nails, and Lady Gaga are among the musicians from which the participating artists drew their inspiration.

The show closes on February 13, so in case you can’t go see the works yourself, take a look at (most of) the work on view here.

Adam Pendleton, Untitled (Dr Dre, The Chronic) 2021.

Adam Pendleton, Untitled (Dr Dre, The Chronic) (2021), reimagining the Dr. Dre album The Chronic (1992), silk screen ink on canvas. Courtesy of the artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles.

Amoako Boafo, 6Lack - Black Woolen Hat 2021

Amoako Boafo, 6Lack – Black Woolen Hat (2021), reimagining the album FREE 6LACK (2016), oil on canvas. Courtesy of the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles, California.

Anna Park, intermission (2021), reimagining the Billie Eilish album When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go? (2019), charcoal on paper mounted on panel. PrivateCollection.

Anna Weyant, Dessert, 2021

Anna Weyant, dessert (2021), reimagining the Gwen Stefani album The Sweet Escape (2006), oil on canvas, courtesy of the artist and Gagosian

burnt toast, Seeing Sounds (2021), reimagining the N*E*R*D album Seeing Sounds (2008), digital file. Courtesy of the artist.

Cecily Brown, If Teardrops Could Be Bottled (2021), reimagining the Billie Eilish EP don’t smile at me (2017), oil on linen. Courtesy of the artist.

chloe wise, The River’s All Wet (2021), reimagining the Yeah Yeah Yeahs album It’s Blitz! (2009), oil on linen. Courtesy of the artist and Almine Rech.

Damien Hirst, addict (2021), reimagining the Eminem album The Slim Shady LP (1999), mixed media. PrivateCollection.

derrick adams, The Breakthrough (2021), reimagining the Mary J. Blige album The Breakthrough (2005) Acrylic on wood panel. Courtesy of the artist.

Ed Ruscha, All Eyez on Me (2021), reimagining the 2Pac album All Eyez on Me (1996) Acrylic on linen. PrivateCollection.

Emily MaeSmith, broken (2021), reimagining the Nine Inch Nails EP broken (1992) oil on linen. Courtesy of the artist and Petzel Gallery, New York.

Ferrari Sheppard, Blackstreet Harmony (2021), reimagining the song “No Diggity” (featuring Dr Dre and Queen Pen) from the Blackstreet album another level (1996), acrylic, charcoal and 24k gold on canvas. Ferrari Shepherd Studio.

Genesis Tramaine, Black Woman Saint Cleans Jesus (2021), reimagining the Summer Walker album Over It (2019), acrylic, oil paint, Lawry’s Seasoning Salt, the Holy Spirit. Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech.

Henni Alftan, untitled (2021), reimagining the Olivia Rodrigo album SOUR (2021), oil on canvas. Courtesy of the artist and Karma, New York.

henry taylor, untitled (2021), reimagining the song “DNA” from the Kendrick Lamar album DAMN (2017), acrylic on canvas. PrivateCollection.

Hilary Pecis, untitled (2021), reimagining the Selena Gomez album rare (2020), acrylic on canvas. PrivateCollection.

Issy Wood, Gwen with All the Obstacles (2021), reimagining the song “Cool” from the Gwen Stefani album love Fishing rod. Music. Infant. (2004), oil on linen. Lent by the artist and Carlos/Ishikawa, London.

jenna gribbon, Lana Watched (2021), reimagining the Lana Del Rey album Born to Die (2012), oil on linen. PrivateCollection.

jennifer guidei, Seeking Hearts (Black Sand MT, Pink Sand, Pink CS, Pink Ground) (2021), reimagining the BLACKPINK album TheAlbum (2020), sand, acrylic and oil on linen. PrivateCollection.

john currin, Newspaper Couple (2016), reimagining the song “Beautiful Day” from the U2 album All That You Can’t Leave Behind (2000), oil on canvas. Gagosian, Courtesy of the artist.

Jordy Kerwick, bloody valentine (2021), reimagining the song “Bloody Valentine” from the Machine Gun Kelly album Tickets to My Downfall (2020), acrylic on canvas. Private Collection, courtesy of Vito Schnabel Gallery.

Julie Curtiss, Venus (2021), reimagining the song “Just a Girl” from the No Doubt album Tragic Kingdom (1995), acrylic and oil on canvas. Courtesy of the artist and Anton Kern Gallery, New York.

KAWS, Better Days Ahead (2021), reimagining the Snoop Dogg album doggy style (1993), acrylic on canvas. PrivateCollection.

Kehinde Wiley, the watcher (2021), reimagining the Dr. Dre album 2001 (1999), oil on canvas. PrivateCollection.

Lauren Halsey, untitled (2021), reimagining the Kendrick Lamar album To Pimp a Butterfly (2015), gypsum on wood. Courtesy of the artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles.

Loie Hollowell, Mandalora Squeeze (2019), reimagining the Lady Gaga album The Fame Monster (2009), oil paint, acrylic medium and case resin on linen over panel. PrivateCollection.

Lucy Bull, 10:00 a.m (2021), reimagining the song “Spiderwebs” from the No Doubt album Tragic Kingdom (1995) oil on linen. PrivateCollection.

marc quinn, We Share Our Chemistry with the Stars (MGK200) (2021), reimagining the Machine Gun Kelly album Tickets to My Downfall (2020), oil on canvas. Marc Quinn Studios.

Matthew Wong, The Outside World (2018), reimagining the Lana Del Rey EP Paradise (2012), gouache on paper. Matt Wong Painter Ltd.

Nicolas Party, Portrait with a Parrot (2021), reimagining the Lady Gaga album Joanne (2016), pastel on cardboard. Private Collection, courtesy of Karma, New York.

Nina Chanel Abney, 2 PM (2021), reimagining the 2Pac album The Don Killuminati: The 7 Day Theory (1996), collage on panel. Pace Prints and courtesy of the artist.

OSGEMEOS, the end (2021), reimagining the Black Eyed Peas album The end (2009), mixed media on MDF. Courtesy of OSGEMEOS.

Rashid Johnson, good kid (2021), reimagining the Kendrick Lamar album good kid, mAAd city (2012), ceramic tile, mirror, red oak, oil stick, spray enamel. Courtesy of the artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles.

Raymond Pettibon, No title (Lake Placid) (2019), reimagining the Lana Del Rey album Norman Fucking Rockwell! (2019), ink on paper. Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner.

Reggie Burrows Hodges, Swimming in Compton: Look Ma (December Day) (2021), reimagining the song “Swimming Pools (Drank)” from the Kendrick Lamar album good kid, mAAd city (2012), acrylic and pastel on canvas. Courtesy of the artist and Karma, New York.

richard prince, untitled (2021), reimagining the Nine Inch Nails album The Downward Spiral (1994), acrylic and ink jet on canvas. Courtesy of Richard Prince.

sayre gomez, Commemorative Merchandising (2021), reimagining the 50 Cent album Get Rich Or Die Tryin’ (2003), acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of François Ghebaly Gallery.

Shepard Fairey, Yeah yeah yeahs (2021), reimagining the Yeah Yeah Yeahs album Fever to Tell (2003), stencil impression and mixed media collage on album covers. Courtesy of Obey Giant Art Inc.

stanley whitney, Roma 32 (2021), reimagining the song “King Kunta” from the Kendrick Lamar album To Pimp a Butterfly (2015), oil on linen. Courtesy of Lisson Gallery.

Takashi Murakami, Goodbye & Good Riddance (2021), reimagining the Juice WRLD album Goodbye & Good Riddance (2018), acrylic on canvas mounted on wood frame. Courtesy of Kaikai Kiki Co Limited.

Titus Kaphar, Seeing Through Time (2021), reimagining the Eve album scorpio (2001) oil on panel. PrivateCollection.

Toyin Ojih Odutola, damn (2021), reimagining the Kendrick Lamar album DAMN. (2017), graphite on black board; graphite on Duralar. PrivateCollection.

Umar Rashid, The Dar al harb according to Tupac. Or, Shakur vs the other world. Earth like, violent, and prone to frequent periods of injustice. Alas, if one seeks it, one can find beauty in the hideous. (Me against the world) (2021), reimagining the 2Pac album Me Against the World (1995) Acrylic and spray paint on canvas. Courtesy of Half Gallery and Blum and Poe.

will boone, HELMET (2021), reimagining the Helmet album mean time (1992), acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of the artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles.

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